Speakers

Speakers

Speakers


 

Gary Humphries

Gary Humphries


Board Chair,
RSPCA Australia

Welcome and introduction – Have we, do we, and will we treat dogs as we should?

Jed Goodfellow


Senior Policy Officer, RSPCA Australia


Senior Inspector of Prosecutions, RSPCA Queensland

Georgia Sakrzewski


Senior Inspector of Prosecutions, RSPCA Queensland

Are we there yet? Assessing the adequacy of legal reforms to stop puppy farms

Puppy farm operators are very good at concealing their location, with local residents often not being aware of their existence. Finding these cruel enterprises is difficult and relies upon good collaboration and coordination. Recent cases highlight the preparation involved in seizing animals from abominable conditions and how evidence is collected for prosecution as well as the work to rehabilitate and rehome these unfortunate dogs. The anticipated impact of the recently introduced Queensland Animal Management (Protecting Puppies) Bill, which is designed to reduce animal welfare offences related to puppy farming will also be described.

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Mia Cobb

Mia Cobb


Managing Director, Working Dog Alliance

DogLogBook – helping dogs get the best out of life

September 2016 saw the launch of a world-first app - DogLogBook - that will not only help owners help their dogs be happier and healthier, but could also play a life-saving role by teaching young dogs to behave better - thereby reducing the chances of pups falling victim to what are currently their top killers.

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Jan Allen

Jan Allen


One Health Program Manager, AMRRIC

Manymuk watu – a dog’s life in remote Indigenous communities

The ‘One Health’ approach is achieving success in addressing key dog welfare issues in Indigenous communities including overpopulation, disease and injury, as well as having a positive impact on human health. AMRRIC encourages a grass roots approach to engage communities and establish sustainable programs. Achievements, challenges and future aspirations will be highlighted.

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Rachele Lowe

Rachele Lowe


Veterinary Surgeon and Director, Mosman Vet Hospital

Pedigree dogs – when aesthetics and welfare conflict

Dog breeding is big business and breed trends come and go. Brachycephalic (short head) breeds are very popular but unfortunately this has led to an influx of serious health and welfare issues associated with breeding practices. The snuffling, wheezing and snoring of these dogs have received acceptance by the public as being normal and characteristic of these breeds rather than aspects to be of concern. What can we do to ensure these dogs can live a happier and healthier life?

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Deb Millikan

Deb Millikan


Board & Steering Committee Member, Pet Professional Guild

Dog training then, now and into the future

The methods used to train our pet dogs has been evolving due to the emergence of sound science which clearly demonstrates the benefits and effectiveness of force-free training as well as a growing need and interest from the community for ethical training methods. The need to assist dog owners to access force-free training and options to ensure appropriate training standards are maintained will be discussed.

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Karen Dawson

Karen Dawson


Veterinary Behaviour Consultant, Pet Behaviour Clinic at the Veterinary Specialist Services

Through their eyes – the impact of being raised as a racing greyhound

Since early 2015, the Australian greyhound racing industry has been under the spotlight after exposure of live baiting. In response, several states initiated inquiries with the NSW Premier announcing in July this year closure of the industry by mid-2017. Live baiting is one of many serious and inherent welfare issues within the industry. However, in addition to the consequences of live baiting on behaviour, a significant issue which is not apparent, is the lack of socialisation of most greyhounds, which also significantly affects their behaviour. These issues have a dramatic influence on the future fate of greyhounds.

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