Our role

The state and territory member Societies provide services to animals in need through their shelters and inspectorates. In the national office, RSPCA Australia works to influence animal welfare policy, practice and legislation across the country
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Key issues

The RSPCA advocates for the welfare of animals across a number of industries, issues and platforms. Help from our supporters is important to progress change. Working together is key.
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Priority issue
Australia is closer than it has ever…
Live sheep export

Support us

Whether you're an individual or a business, there are multiple ways you can support the RSPCA
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Donate now to support your local RSPCA and make a difference to animal welfare across Australia
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About

The RSPCA is an independent, community-based charity providing animal care and protection services across the country.
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Annual statistics

Adopt

By choosing adoption, you’ll not only have the chance to make a friend for life, but you’ll be giving an animal a second chance and helping support the RSPCA.
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Make a difference to a pet’s life today.
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Microchipping

Microchipping your pet is very important. If your pet becomes lost then you are far more likely to become reunited if he or she is microchipped.

A microchip is a permanent method of electronic identification. The chip itself is very small – about the size of a grain of rice – and is implanted just under the skin, between the shoulder blades at the back of your pet's neck. Each chip has a unique number that is detected using a microchip scanner. The microchip number is recorded on a database registry with details about the animal and owner. Should your pet stray or become lost, vets, animal shelters and local councils can scan your pet for a microchip and contact you via the database.

It is very important to keep your contact details up to date on the database so that if you move house or change your phone number you will still be contactable in the event of your pet becoming lost/stray.

Ideally your pet should be microchipped prior to you purchasing or adopting your pet. This is the only way to effectively trace the origin of the cat/dog. However, if your pet is not yet microchipped then we recommend that you make an appointment to do so with your vet (even in those states or territories where microchipping is not compulsory).

Microchip identification is recommended for all companion animals where it is appropriate and feasible for the species.

If a pet is transferred to a new owner, the new owner must ensure their contact details are recorded on the database.

For more information on microchipping, visit the Knowledgebase.

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